Adding An Above-Ground Pool, Summer Fun!


 

Adding an Above-Ground Pool

By: Julie Sturgeon

Published: March 10, 2010

If you don’t want the expense or hassle of installing an in-ground swimming pool, an above-ground pool is an affordable alternative.

Progress K
Effort Med 2-5 days (frame pool install)
Investment Med $4,000 (basic frame pool)
Added to Binder

 

Above Ground Pool Additions Tips For Above Ground PoolFrame pools, which have a metal frame and an interior pool liner, come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The most popular option is a 24-foot round pool. Image: Trendium Pool Products

A swimming pool may not add value to your home and property, but if you’re wanting that backyard cooling-off spot, an above-ground swimming pool costs far less than an in-ground pool. At around $6,000 for a basic above-ground model versus $30,000 for in-ground, you’ll spend 80% less, and you avoid the disruption of heavy equipment digging up your backyard.

Of course, if you select upgrades like patterned or textured liners, fancy stairs, and custom decking, you could up the price for an above-ground pool to $15,000 or more. At that point, it makes sense to consider an in-ground investment, which you may be able to list as a selling amenity someday.

Ring pools: the least expensive option

Above-ground pools come in two basic types: ring and frame. Ring pools, also known as “float to fill,” are commonly around 12 feet in diameter and 3 feet high. Made of heavy-duty vinyl, they get their name from an inflatable ring at the top of the pool, which rises as the pool fills with water and lifts the sidewalls into place. The filled pool is flask-shaped, wider at the bottom than the top for greater stability.

A 12-foot ring pool holds approximately 1,400 gallons of water, enough to require chlorine tablets for chemical balance and a filtration pump. You can buy one for these for around $300, load it into the back of the SUV, and get it ready for filling the same day. Many families see this as an inexpensive way to test the waters on pool ownership and maintenance.

Frame pools: more costly and more permanent

A frame pool has a sturdy metal frame and an interior pool liner. One of these can stay up year-round, although it can be disassembled in a matter of hours. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes; the most popular size is a 24-foot round, which gives plenty of room for laps or a rowdy game of water polo. Most frame pools come with a lifetime warranty that translates into 25 to 30 years of practical use, even with kids pushing off the sides and jumping off the deck area.

The typical frame pool has walls that are 48 inches to 54 inches high, which means you’ll need a ladder to get in and out. Depending on the size and shape of your yard, installers may be able to bury one end of the steel framework deeper in the ground to create different water levels, but even with this trick, 6.5 feet is the depth limit. Once the pool is set up, you can add decking or landscaping to make it look like a more permanent feature of the yard.

A bare-bones frame pool costs around $4,000, and as much as double that if you add niceties like a high-end patterned liner or a wood frame to blend in better with the landscape. As with a ring pool, you use the backyard hose to fill these with the requisite 3,000 to 6,000 gallons.

Depending on size, plan on two to five days for installation, which includes leveling the site and laying a sand bed. The best time to get on a dealer’s installation list is in the winter or early spring. The impulse-buying nature of an above-ground pool means dealers can be backed up several weeks once summer turns hot.

Maintenance and safety issues

Above-ground frame pools need many of the same working parts as inground versions, such as filters and automatic pool cleaners. They can definitely support a heater, although to keep costs proportionate, many people just spread a solar blanket over the pool when not in use. It’s also possible to hook up automatic cleaners on the circulation line to avoid manually cleaning the sides.

Chemicals are required, but in smaller quantities. Plan on spending an average of $400 a season on chlorine, compared with $600 for an inground pool. Homeowners also need to be aware of local safety ordinances and erect the appropriate fencing. In many jurisdictions, fencing can be attached to the top of the pool itself instead of around the perimeter of the yard.

Because it isn’t permanent, an above-ground pool doesn’t require a permit, and it won’t impact the resale value of your home. Note that some homeowners associations or developers don’t allow them, and they’re not suited for diving. It’s always a good idea to notify your insurance agent that you’ve added an above-ground pool, as coverage policies vary.

Julie Sturgeon has written about residential pools for nearly a decade. She owns an inground pool because that’s what came with the house.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/articles/adding-above-ground-pool/#ixzz1PIOqLFqs

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The Mistress in Real Estate


Many have bought their first home or may be even a second or third one.  Each time you bought a home, did you hear that infamous line;  “it’s a buyer/sellers market” and off you were to look at homes.  Did your Real Estate agent ever tell you about the mistress you would have to deal with when you bought your home?

You didn’t know there was a mistress in your deal? Well, there is or was, depending on where you are at in the process.  If you are a buyer, right now, you think the market is yours to control.  You can ask the seller to pay some of  your closing costs, contribute to point buy down, have the seller maybe provide a year or so home warranty program.  If you are buying an association home, you may even ask the seller to pay one or two years of association dues.  How about that big screen TV or the couch that makes the room.  Did you ask the seller to through that into the deal?

What if you are the seller. Right now you may feel like your hands are tied and you have to pretty much give your home away.  Maybe you did through that TV/couch in the deal, paid those association dues or purchased the home warranty program the buyer asked for.  Maybe you went as far to include a car in the garage with the deal.  No, I am not making this up, this is one crazy thing I have seen offered for the right price for the home.

Well, what about the mistress that REALLY controls the deal whether you are a buyer or a seller.  You don’t know to whom I am referring to? The Government.  They are the ones that have more control over a deal than even a  buyer or a seller.  Since the crash of the market, the Federal Government has really had more control over any deal.  Whether it is contributing an incentive program to bring the buyers out, to the taking away of the incentive or raising interest rates, yes, they have more power in the deal than one thinks.

Lets also look at how the government is compensating for all the short sales/foreclosures that are happening.  The Government stood by and watched as many home owners homes went upside down.  They did nothing to the banks that sat around refusing to help persons on the verge of loosing their home, nor did they make the banks work with the owners to make payments affordable for those that wanted to stay in their home and were trying their best to work something out.  Instead, the government sat back as banks took anywhere from 9 months to over a year to respond to potential offers from buyers on contracts submitted.  Then some even claimed they were in financial ruins…but what about the sellers? 

Now, many persons have lost their homes even if they were trying to work something out with the banks and there are an amazingly huge number of homes that are sitting vacant.  How about the sellers that are trying to do a traditional sale?  They now have to contend with the never ending battle of how am I to sell my home and not be punished by the short sale/foreclosures on the market.  Their home will be appraised against the homes in their respective neighborhoods that have been sold at a discounted price due to hardships by the past owner.  Again, the government continues to let this happen.

Shouldn’t the government at least try to help sellers that have kept their heads above water and not just walked away from their home with some sort of break?   This would be a positive incentive and still keep some value in our neighborhoods.  How should the government do this?  Well, that is the million dollar question.  Maybe these sellers get a bigger break on their new interest rate or maybe they get a break on their taxes in the year the home was sold.   I am sure there is something this mistress of the government could do to keep the housing market alive and moving.

So the next time you are thinking of buying or selling a home, remember to consider the mistress you will have to contend with.  If you are a buyer, you will have to have a down payment, good credit and choose a program that you may have to work through many hoops.  If you are a seller, you may have to come to the table with some of your own cash to sell your home, or maybe it’s time to consider bringing back the CD’s to help in your sell.

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